Halloween sweets and children’s teeth: Tips for treating your sweet tooth while keeping it healthy

  • Thursday, October 26, 2017 9:53am
  • Life

With Halloween and mass candy consumption fast approaching, Delta Dental of Washington (DDWA) offers simple tips on how to keep kids teeth health.

Monitor candy consumption and drink water: Moderation is key. Instead of letting your kids have free rein over their trick-or-treat bounty, monitor their intake by allowing a few pieces at a time after meals followed promptly by a glass of water.

Choose chocolate: When it comes to sweets, some candies are better for your teeth than others. Because chocolate melts and is not sticky, it is less likely to hide in the crevasses of your teeth and is easier to brush and rinse away.

Avoid sticky and chewy candy: Hard and gummy candies, as well as caramels and taffy, cling to teeth and hide in cracks allowing cavity-causing bacteria to set in.

Participate in a buy-back program: Some dentists offer buy-back programs offering up to a dollar per pound of sweets traded-in at the office. If there aren’t any in your area, consider inventing your own!

In addition to these tips, DDWA strongly encourages kids to brush twice a day, floss daily and have dental check-ups every six months.

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