Lifestyle

About thinking styles | Gustafson

Norman Cousins - Courtesy photo
Norman Cousins
— image credit: Courtesy photo

Norman Cousins had just recovered from a life-threatening illness when he wrote his famous autobiographical book, "Anatomy of an Illness – As Perceived by the Patient" (1979 W.W. Norton & Co., Inc.).

By the time of his writing, his doctors had long given up on finding effective treatments for him, let alone a cure for his demise. Mr. Cousins had to save his own life

Left to his own devices, he decided to spend whatever time he had left watching funny movies and reading uplifting literature. Nothing negative or dysfunctional was allowed near him. In the end, he laughed himself not sick but healthy. By all accounts, Norman Cousin set a new record for the power of positive thinking.

I myself do strongly believe in the power of positive thinking. As a clinical healthcare professional, I have seen it working its magic again and again. "Positive thinkers" know how to motivate and inspire themselves and others, even in the face of overwhelming adversity.

It is not likely that we are born with a particular disposition, positive or negative, although opinions about the subject may differ. In any case, it is clear that positive thinking can be learned. Destructive thoughts can be changed and turned into constructive ones. For some people this may be harder than for others, but it is possible for everyone and at any stage in life.

Normally, we like to think that our thoughts accurately reflect the real world, that our judgment is more or less sound and that we have a realistic view of things. This includes the beliefs we have about ourselves. But we all experience now and then a change of heart, a sudden insight known as an "Aha!-moment," a disclosure experience, a revelation. When this happens, we may be forced to alter our old perspectives and adopt new ones.

Many of my clients who undergo significant lifestyle changes, voluntarily or forced by circumstance, face considerable challenges. Most are quite willing to modify their eating habits, quit smoking or drinking, increase their physical activity level and so on. But their thinking often remains untouched. What changes is their outside behavior but not their inner convictions. They don't take real ownership of their treatment and, therefore, they don't have a solid foundation on which they can build their future progress.

Creating real change

Positive thinking can be a tremendous asset in many ways, but especially as an instrument for healing. Positive thinking is not what some call a "Pollyanna" attitude, an overoptimistic, naive account of the world. Positive thinking, correctly understood and practiced, is a change of mind that taps into our inner, most powerful resources, which can help us to generate real change.

So I would like to invite you to answer for yourself the following questions:

• Do your thoughts provide you with a generally positive, hopeful outlook?

• Do your thoughts support your goals and aspirations?

• Do they motivate and inspire you to take action?

• Do they provide you with clear directions for your life's path?

• Do they enhance your self-worth?

• Do they make you feel satisfied with your life and your accomplishments?

If you can respond "yes" to most or all of these questions, you may already be moving in the right direction. If not, here is your chance to get started.

Timi Gustafson R.D. is a registered dietitian, newspaper columnist, blogger and author of the book "The Healthy Diner – How to Eat Right and Still Have Fun"®, which is available on her blog and at amazon.com.  For more articles on nutrition, health and lifestyle, visit her blog, "Food and Health with Timi Gustafson R.D." (www.timigustafson.com). You can follow Timi on Twitter and on www.facebook.com.

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