Eldergrow’s educators will teach and build relationships with residents through ongoing enrichment classes on horticulture, culinary and garden art. COURTESY PHOTO, Kevin Knox

Seniors’ therapeutic horticulture takes root at Village Concepts in Auburn

  • Wednesday, July 12, 2017 11:14am
  • News

Village Concepts, a third generation family-owned business helping seniors thrive in retirement and assisted living communities throughout Washington state, has announced a garden partnership at Brannan Park Retirement in Auburn.

The Eldergrow™ garden will introduce the first therapeutic horticulture program specifically designed for Village Concepts residents.

“Enrichment programs at Village Concepts are constantly expanding, and we are excited to further that commitment with Eldergrow as we provide our residents with fun opportunities for lifelong learning,” said Stuart Brown, Village Concepts chief operating officer. “Residents will be able to experience the satisfaction of creating and nurturing their own garden, just like at home, while attending classes and enjoying the fruits of their labor complete with arts and cooking activities.”

Brannan Park launched the pioneering program with a garden design kickoff Monday. Residents can enjoy the benefits of sensory stimulation and connecting with nature while they choose plants and herbs to transplant into the therapy garden. The indoor therapy garden and wellness program is coordinated through Eldergrow, an award-winning Seattle-based startup dedicated to bringing the joys and benefits of nature indoors.

“We are thrilled to partner with Village Concepts,” said Orla Concannon, founder of Eldergrow. “Along with the therapeutic benefits, gardening gives residents something to look forward to, like waiting for that bud to blossom. The residents at Brannan Park will enjoy a myriad of classes as they watch life grow.”

Eldergrow’s educators will teach and build relationships with residents through ongoing enrichment classes on horticulture, culinary and garden art; with applications ranging from a Margherita pizza topped with homegrown basil and tomatoes, or freshly snipped lavender for closet sachets. Educators also help in maintaining garden health and delivering seasonal plants. Studies show that horticulture therapy increases self-esteem, improves motor skills, reduces the risk factors for dementia and decreases medication. It also provides residents with a renewed sense of purpose as they care for their garden.

For more information, call 888-548-6609 or visit villageconcepts.com.

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