Dominica Myers

Dominica Myers

King County Library System hires director of diversity, equity and inclusion

Dominica Myers oversaw racial equity and social impact initiatives with Seattle Opera

The King County Library System (KCLS) has hired Dominica Myers as its new director of diversity, equity and inclusion.

Myers joined KCLS in October to head the Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Department in a newly created leadership role, and will report to KCLS Executive Director Lisa Rosenblum.

Born and raised in Washington state, Myers comes to KCLS from Seattle Opera where she served as the associate director of administration with responsibility for company-wide Racial Equity and Social Impact initiatives.

Myers will be paid an annual salary of between $125,856 and $151,031, according to a public records request to the King County Library System.

Myers earned a master’s degree in nonprofit leadership from Seattle University and holds a bachelor’s degree in theatre arts with a minor in Spanish from Central Washington University in Ellensburg. She also serves on the Inspire Washington board of trustees and the Tacoma Creates advisory board.

“KCLS is deeply committed to diversity, equity and inclusion as part of our service to the public,” Rosenblum said in a Oct. 30 news release. “We began recruitment for this new role in July to expand leadership on our DEI initiatives, and we welcome Dominica to KCLS.”

“The people and geography of King County are a diverse tapestry of lived experiences, and the Library System is a reflection of that,” Myers said. “KCLS holds a tremendous responsibility for stewarding the public’s resources and trust toward creating an equitable and inclusive experience for patrons of all backgrounds. As the new DEI director, I certainly feel the weight of this charge, but am excited for the journey with you.”

“We greatly miss Dominica, though are very excited for the King County Library System to benefit from the expertise she will bring to this new position,” said Seattle Opera General Director Christina Scheppelmann. “Seattle Opera’s first Racial Equity and Social Impact Plan is the biggest and lasting impact of her tenure. Her leadership was indispensable for this crucial and thorough plan.”

Founded in 1942, the King County Library System serves the communities of King County (outside the City of Seattle), and has 50 libraries and more than 700,000 cardholders.




Talk to us

Please share your story tips by emailing editor@auburn-reporter.com.

To share your opinion for publication, submit a letter through our website https://www.auburn-reporter.com/submit-letter/. Include your name, address and daytime phone number. (We’ll only publish your name and hometown.) Please keep letters to 300 words or less.

More in Northwest

Governor Jay Inslee. Sound Publishing file photo
New laws will tax the rich, offer aid to low-income workers

Inslee signs bill creating capital gains tax; foes are challenging it in court as unconstitutional.

Washington state case count since March 2020. WA Governor's Office
Pandemic pause: King County remains in Phase 3

No Washington state counties will be rolling back their phase under the… Continue reading

Courtesy of Washington Military Department
Washington gets mobile earthquake alerts

Washington state will have its own earthquake early warning system on May… Continue reading

File photo 
A gray wolf.
Wolf population continues to make a comeback in Washington

The number of wolves in Washington state increased by 22%, marking the… Continue reading

Washington State Capitol Building in Olympia. File photo
Top 10 issues in Washington state’s 2021 legislative session

Democrats used their majorities to muscle through social, economic, environmental and tax policies.

File photo
All fireworks will be illegal in unincorporated King County in 2022

Fireworks will be illegal in unincorporated parts of King County starting in… Continue reading

File photo
Governor gives tenants protections, reduces help for landlords

Landlord help is included in another bill, Inslee says; eviction moratorium to end June 30.

The Monroe Correctional Complex on April 9, 2020. (Sound Publishing file photo)
Formerly incarcerated people regain right to vote in Washington

Rights restored immediately upon release.

Most Read