Congresswoman Kim Schrier, D-WA (8th District) seeks nominees for a new heroes program to honor people who have made a difference during the COVID-19 outbreak. FILE PHOTO

Congresswoman Kim Schrier, D-WA (8th District) seeks nominees for a new heroes program to honor people who have made a difference during the COVID-19 outbreak. FILE PHOTO

Schrier launches WA-08 Heroes program

Seeks nominees from 8th Congressional District

Congresswoman Kim Schrier, D-WA (8th District) launched the WA-08 Heroes program on Tuesday, June 2, to highlight neighbors, businesses, nonprofits and organizations of the 8th Congressional district that have come to the aid of their communities and stepped up during the COVID-19 pandemic.

“I am continually heartened by the strength and resiliency I see demonstrated by Washingtonians in this challenging moment,” Schrier said in a press release. “The WA-08 Heroes program is an opportunity to elevate the stories of those who have gone above and beyond to help those around them. Our communities are better because of the willingness of these individuals, small businesses, and organizations stepping up and lending a helping hand, and this program will allow their selfless resolve to be recognized and appreciated. I look forward to hearing the stories from around our district and am optimistic their courageous dedication will bring joy and hope to my fellow Washingtonians.”

Nominations from the public can be submitted here. Nominees will be highlighted via Schrier’s social media accounts and on her official website. Nominees can include someone who lives, works, and/or volunteers in the Eighth District; a small business; or a nonprofit or organization.

All Washingtonians are currently living through a challenging time, filled with uncertainty and anxiety. In the face of new challenges, residents of Washington’s 8th District have gone above and beyond to help our community.

Our front line workers have put the needs of other before their own, risking their safety to stock grocery store shelves, care for patients in hospitals and nursing home facilities, deliver packages, and much more. Others have joined in from their homes, creating long-distance learning plans for our kids, and creating masks and other PPE by hand.

Nominations can include:

— Someone who lives, works, and/or volunteers in our district

— A small business in our district

— A non-profit or organization in our district




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