Cleaning up the complex | Metzler

Solving the multifamily recycling puzzle

Recycling in apartments and multifamily housing is a real puzzle. People are constantly moving in and out of complexes. Languages and cultural backgrounds vary, and tenants have different levels of knowledge and experience when it comes to recycling.

Then there’s the space problem. Space for recycling containers is often tight inside individual apartments as well as in parking lots where larger recycling containers are stationed. It can be challenging to find room to store recyclables in an apartment. It can also be discouraging when you go to empty recyclables in the larger container outside and find the container overflowing.

These factors can lead to problems: garbage in recycling carts and frustrated tenants who want to do the right thing but are not empowered to “recycle right.”

What’s a recycler to do?

The good news is, local governments and Waste Management are making progress in solving this puzzle. What we’ve learned, essentially, is that better multifamily recycling comes down to three fundamentals: engaged property management, infrastructure design, and tenant education.

Even more good news: New guidelines from Waste Management are proving helpful as we partner with property managers and tenants to improve recycling. We call the guidelines the Three Cs – Convenience, Clarity, and Capacity.

1. Convenience: Make recycling and garbage containers convenient for tenants to access.

2. Clarity: Label containers with photographs and images to show tenants what items go where.

3. Capacity: “Right size” containers so recycling bins don’t fill up or overflow before pickup day.

Now, in addition to the three Cs, we’ve also added an E for Education. By that, we mean education for multifamily housing staff and tenants. This is extremely important to ensure that recycling practices happen correctly and consistently. That’s why Waste Management developed the Recycling All Stars Program — to help property managers put all the right pieces in the right places.

How is the picture coming together?

We’re making progress. Last year, Waste Management worked directly with 129 properties in two counties, reaching more than 2,300 multifamily households. Together, the households increased recycling by 237 cubic yards per week. To understand this impact, think of 24 dump trucks piled high with recyclables. That’s how much more material was recycled last year, rather than going to the landfill. Today, the learning from those partnerships is being applied across the Puget Sound region. Program resources are available online at wmnorthwest.com/recyclingallstars.

Is there more to be done?

Absolutely, and we can’t do it alone. With ongoing partnerships from local governments, property managers, and multifamily tenants, we will continue to improve multifamily recycling. Along the way, we will put more pieces in place to solve this unique recycling puzzle and make our communities cleaner and greener.

Michelle Metzler is the recycling education & outreach manager for Waste Management. Have more recycling questions? When in doubt, find out at recycleoftenrecycleright.com.


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