Photo by Visitor7/Wikimedia

Photo by Visitor7/Wikimedia

A bill before lawmakers would outlaw concealed carry on private property

Opponents say that such a move would undermine the safety and rights of gun owners.

A proposal before lawmakers could make it a crime for someone to carry a concealed weapon into another person’s home without permission.

The current law allows someone to carry a concealed handgun anywhere in the state with a concealed weapon permit, the acquisition of which requires a background check with both state and federal databases.

SB 6415, and its companion bill in the house, HB 2738, would make it unlawful for someone to carry a concealed firearm into another person’s home without expressed permission, even with a license to carry. A violation of the law would be a misdemeanor. Also, the bill proposes that if convicted, he or she would have their concealed pistol license revoked for five years.

Senator Sam Hunt, D-Olympia, the bill’s prime sponsor, said he brought the bill before lawmakers after hearing from a constituent named Suzanne Cofer who found a handgun left behind in her home after a get together.

“It should be my right to keep guns out of my own home,” she said.

Paul Strophy with the Washington Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers said the five year revocation penalty on the concealed carry bill is too extreme for the circumstances.

Tom Kwieciak, speaking on behalf of the National Rifle Association, agreed. He said those who have a concealed carry license go through extensive background checks and are the least likely gun owners to commit a crime.

“We think that 6415 targets some of the most responsible and law abiding citizens in the state and will do nothing to increase public safety,” Strophy said.

He also said a property owner already has the right to ask someone to leave if they are opposed to that person carrying a gun.

“This bill attempts to cast a scarlet letter on over 600,000 legitimate Washington state concealed pistol license holders,” said Phil Watson, speaking for the Firearms Policy Commission.

Watson also said that hundreds of professions require people to enter private property on a daily basis. Those workers, he said, should have a right to protect themselves by carrying a concealed firearm. To ask the property owner’s permission every time they have to do their job would be ridiculous, he said.

“Disclosing you have legally concealed firearms runs counter to the very purpose of concealing them in the first place and could cause undue confusion, panic, and unwarranted alarm from those not familiar with guns,” he said.

James McMahan, policy director for the Washington Association of Sheriffs and Police Chiefs spoke in favor of the bill, but said it needs an amendment to protect law enforcement officers who carry firearms and enter private property in the line of duty.

The bill was heard on Tuesday Jan. 30 and is scheduled for executive action on Thursday Feb. 1.

A similar bill on firearm storage, SB5463, sponsored by Senator Guy Palumbo, D-Bothell, mandates civil penalties for unsafe firearm storage. The bill faced stiff opposition from gun rights activists during its hearing on Jan. 15.

Gun rights activists expressed opposition to any enforcement of the storage bill, resisting the idea that officers could mandate gun storage in their own homes.

This report was produced by the Olympia bureau of the Washington Newspaper Publishers Association.

More in Northwest

Sen. Mona Das, D-Kent, the primary sponsor of SB 5323, speaking on the bill. (Photo courtesy of Hannah Sabio-Howell)
Proposed law adds a fee to plastic bags at checkout

Senate passes bill to ban single-use plastic bags, place 8-cent fee on reusable plastic bags.

In November 2019, Washington voters approved Initiative 976, which calls for $30 car tabs. Sound Publishing file photo
Republicans try to guarantee $30 car tabs amid court hangup

Lawmakers sponsor companion bills in the House and Senate.

King County Metro’s battery-electric bus. Photo courtesy of kingcounty.gov
King County could bump up Metro electrification deadlines

Transportation generates nearly half of all greenhouse gas emissions in the state.

Gov. Jay Inslee delivered his 2020 State of the State Address on Tuesday, Jan. 14. (Photo courtesy of Washington State Office of the Governor)
Gov. Inslee delivers State of the State Address

By Leona Vaughn, WNPA News Service OLYMPIA — Gov. Jay Inslee stood… Continue reading

Rep. Laurie Jinkins, D-Tacoma, was sworn in Jan. 13, 2020, as Speaker of the House. Photo by Cameron Sheppard, WNPA News Service
Jinkins sworn in as WA’s first female Speaker of the House

Rep. Laurie Jinkins, D-Tacoma, is applauded by her colleagues as she becomes… Continue reading

A 50-minute film called “Spawning Grounds,” which documents the effort to save a freshwater variety of kokanee salmon from Lake Sammamish, is finally ready for its debut in North Bend on Jan. 18. (Screenshot from film)
Spawning Grounds: Lake Sammamish kokanee documentary premieres Jan. 18

The film tracks the ‘all hands on deck’ effort to save the little red fish from extinction.

Meet the group trying to electrify America’s railroads

The Backbone Campaign hopes it will reduce emissions and jump-start depressed communities.

A man works on a balcony at the Cedar Pointe Apartments, a 255 apartment complex for seniors 55+, on Jan. 6, 2020, in Arlington, Washington. (Andy Bronson/The Herald)
Washington state has been under-producing housing units for decades

A new report said there should have been an additional 225,000 units created between 2010 and 2015.

Most Read