Ron Paul campaign lends excitement to state Republican convention

The Washington State Republican convention last weekend in Spokane should have been dull and uneventful. All they had to do was approve a slate of national convention delegates to support the obvious nominee, John McCain, vote for a short, concise party platform and leave town. Instead the tenacious Ron Paul people, who made up more than a third of the delegates, contested the McCain forces on virtually every front.

The Washington State Republican convention last weekend in Spokane should have been dull and uneventful.

All they had to do was approve a slate of national convention delegates to support the obvious nominee, John McCain, vote for a short, concise party platform and leave town.

Instead the tenacious Ron Paul people, who made up more than a third of the delegates, contested the McCain forces on virtually every front. When the convention finally closed early Saturday evening, the Paul people promptly held a march outside the convention center and a boisterous rally across the street. They just don’t know when to quit.

It’s this way across the country. The Ron Paul campaign, out of the running for months, continues to cruise in high gear.

Can’t these people do the math?

Of course they can. But Ron Paul’s candidacy isn’t about the math, at least not in the short term. It’s not even about the man himself. It’s about a movement. And what’s driving that movement is the conviction of many Americans that business as usual by both parties has broken the government. President Bush’s approval ratings are in the low to mid 30s. The Democratic Congress’s approval ratings are under 20 percent. Americans seek a bridge between talk and action.

For many Democrats and much of the media that bridge is Barack Obama, probably the most gifted orator in a generation. He’s new, fresh, invigorating. But what does he want to actually DO? Many of his supporters don’t know or particularly care. The Obama campaign isn’t about ideas or an agenda. It’s about him.

For Ron Paul, the message is the change. For nearly 20 years in Congress from suburban Houston, Dr. Paul, (he delivered 4,000 babies before turning to politics), has walked his talk. Never has he voted for an unbalanced budget or a tax increase. He doesn’t shop for federal “perks” for his constituents, nor has he ever sought or accepted an earmarked appropriation.

His new book, a manifesto on applying libertarian principles to political action, hit the No. 1 position on the NY Times best-seller list its first week out. He’s written detailed policy primers on returning to the gold standard, getting the U.S. out of Iraq, and calling it quits on the war on drugs. Extreme? Here and there. But also consistent.

And it doesn’t stop at the office. He won’t accept the handsome pension he’s entitled to after two decades in Congress.

His main difference with McCain is over the war, along with Paul’s libertarian social agenda of legalizing drugs and prostitution. But on several key domestic issues, McCain and Paul are in close alignment.

McCain and Paul also line up on taxes. And on the biggest domestic issue in the next decade, health care, McCain and Paul would let people choose their own health care plan and deduct health care spending from their taxes, while Obama and Sen. Clinton would do precisely the opposite and expand the government’s role.

Ideas, not imagery, will ultimately change Washington, D.C. That is what the upcoming battle between McCain and Obama should be about. Millions of Ron Paul supporters and sympathizers will be watching. Their candidate has lost but his movement is growing.

John Carlson hosts a daily radio program with KOMO 4’s Ken Schram each weekday at 9 AM on AM 570 KVI. He also broadcasts daily radio commentary on KOMO 1000 news. E-mail him at jcarlson@fisherradio.com or johncarlson@komoradio.com


Talk to us

Please share your story tips by emailing editor@auburn-reporter.com.

To share your opinion for publication, submit a letter through our website https://www.auburn-reporter.com/submit-letter/. Include your name, address and daytime phone number. (We’ll only publish your name and hometown.) Please keep letters to 300 words or less.

More in Opinion

Richard Elfers is a columnist, a former Enumclaw City Council member and a Green River College professor.
Age of insanity for the left and the right

Do you feel that, like the COVID-19 pandemic, insane behavior is spreading… Continue reading

Federal Way resident Bob Roegner is a former mayor of Auburn. Contact bjroegner@comcast.net.
Should the King County sheriff be elected or appointed? | Roegner

The question for King County residents is more complicated than it appears.

Face masks save lives and jobs across Washington

Wearing a mask saves lives and saves jobs. And all across the… Continue reading

Don Brunell
Seattle faces ‘lights out’ in 2022

Far too few people remember the 1972 Seattle billboard: “Would the last… Continue reading

Federal Way resident Bob Roegner is a former mayor of Auburn. Contact bjroegner@comcast.net.
The police department of the future | Roegner

Based on comments from elected officials and police, the Black Lives Matter… Continue reading

Things in the news that trouble me

There’s so much happening in our country.

Cartoon by Frank Shiers
Editorial: Reopen schools in fall, but do it safely

Don’t bully schools into reopening. Protect our students.

Guests gather to view a photo of Pilchuck Julia during the naming ceremony of the Snohomish River boat landing named for her in August, 2019. (Kevin Clark / Herald file photo)
Editorial: What history is owed through our monuments

The decisions regarding whom we honor in our public squares require deliberation and consensus.

Federal Way resident Bob Roegner is a former mayor of Auburn. Contact bjroegner@comcast.net.
Points of contention on police inquests in King County

Inquests frequently unfold against a backdrop of sadness and drama: Family members’… Continue reading

Jayendrina Singha Ray is a PhD (ABD) in English, with a research focus on the works of the South African Nobel Laureate John Maxwell Coetzee. She teaches English Composition and Research Writing at Highline College, WA, and has previously taught English at colleges in India.
The search for selfhood

What really matters is the desire to find.

Cartoon by Frank Shiers
Editorial: Stopping COVID is now up to each of us

With a resurgence threatening, we need to take greater responsibility to keep the virus in check.

Federal Way resident Bob Roegner is a former mayor of Auburn. Contact bjroegner@comcast.net.
Defund the police department? | Roegner

Our country is at a defining moment in our search for true… Continue reading