Taking time to say thank you to our supporters

As the holidays approach, I would like to take this opportunity to say thank you to King County residents for making KCLS one of the top library systems in the country.

And there is much to be thankful for in 2019. The King County Library System reached a major milestone, received grant funding for new programs and services, bolstered partnerships and continued to serve our diverse communities with strong support from library patrons and advocates.

With the opening of the new Kent Panther Lake Library and the reopening of the renovated Boulevard Park Library this past spring, KCLS officially concluded its $172 million capital bond program, resulting in 50 new, expanded or renovated libraries. We are grateful for the public support that made this milestone possible and the patronage that keeps these beautiful buildings busy every day.

KCLS has more than 700,000 regular cardholders, plus 370,000 student accounts that provide access to online resources for homework help. With library visits exceeding 10 million annually, patrons are taking full advantage of library resources and KCLS’ extensive collection of more than four million items. Checkouts are likely to top 21 million in 2019, and we anticipate being a top digital-circulating library in the United States once again, hoping to extend our streak to six consecutive years in a row.

Strong partnerships with local governments, schools, businesses, nonprofits and other organizations enable KCLS to expand much-needed services throughout the county, such as Summer Meals and Community Court. And our focus on inclusion ensures that our diverse communities have access to programs, classes, resources and community connections at places like the Welcoming Center at Kent Library, which opened in May to serve immigrant and refugee populations.

Each year, the KCLS Foundation’s generous donors fund a variety of children’s, teen and adult programs. Grants from Google, The Boeing Co., and the Moccasin Lake Foundation supported the creation of the IdeaX Makerspace at Bellevue Library, and an IdeaX Makerspace at Federal Way Library opening in early 2020, which will expand important STEM programming to children and adults alike in South King County.

A grant from LYRASIS will allow KCLS to explore ways in which artificial intelligence can improve patrons’ experiences with library services, and the Why Not You Foundation provided funding for teens to create their own programming that helps them develop the skills and confidence to be the leaders of tomorrow.

KCLS is proud of the breadth of its programming, made all the more possible through the advocacy, volunteerism and fundraising efforts of our Friends of the Library. We are equally grateful to our Library Advisory Board members, who work in partnership with KCLS to ensure that library services meet the different needs of our communities.

We look forward to another exciting and busy year ahead in 2020. On behalf of all of us at King County Library System, thank you for your continued support.

Lisa Rosenblum is executive director of the King County Library System.


Talk to us

Please share your story tips by emailing editor@auburn-reporter.com.

To share your opinion for publication, submit a letter through our website https://www.auburn-reporter.com/submit-letter/. Include your name, address and daytime phone number. (We’ll only publish your name and hometown.) Please keep letters to 300 words or less.

More in Opinion

Federal Way resident Bob Roegner is a former mayor of Auburn. Contact bjroegner@comcast.net.
Points of contention on police inquests in King County

Inquests frequently unfold against a backdrop of sadness and drama: Family members’… Continue reading

Guests gather to view a photo of Pilchuck Julia during the naming ceremony of the Snohomish River boat landing named for her in August, 2019. (Kevin Clark / Herald file photo)
Editorial: What history is owed through our monuments

The decisions regarding whom we honor in our public squares require deliberation and consensus.

Federal Way resident Bob Roegner is a former mayor of Auburn. Contact bjroegner@comcast.net.
Defund the police department? | Roegner

Our country is at a defining moment in our search for true… Continue reading

Why this newspaper is capitalizing Black | Editorial

Moving forward, the Auburn Reporter will capitalize Black when referring to the… Continue reading

Doreen Davis, left in mask, waves at parade participants on May 2. Olivia Sullivan/staff photo
Wear your face-hugging, ever-loving mask | Editorial

“Don’t make me come down there.” — New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo,… Continue reading

Jayendrina Singha Ray is a PhD (ABD) in English, with a research focus on the works of the South African Nobel Laureate John Maxwell Coetzee. She teaches English Composition and Research Writing at Highline College, WA, and has previously taught English at colleges in India.
The search for selfhood

What really matters is the desire to find.

Valley police chiefs of King County release unified message in response to death of George Floyd

Police chiefs of Des Moines, Tukwila, Renton, Federal Way, Kent, Auburn, Algona, Pacific, Black Diamond and the Port of Seattle pledge to stand with communities.

Pandemic illustrates the need for government action

Despite spending most of my life in government and politics and working… Continue reading

Back to the wild — a whole new outdoor recreation world | Guest editorial

When enjoying the great outdoors, continue to socially distance and be aware of how else COVID-19 has changed our world.

KCLS is stepping up its commitment to patrons

KCLS has expanding its online resources so patrons can continue to learn, build skills, stay entertained and remain mentally and physically active amid the pandemic.

How using a face mask to cover my Asian face could put me in danger

Since the COVID-19 outbreak began, Asians and Asian Americans have been targeted.

Opinion: Public deserves honest information on sex education

The Washington comprehensive sex education bill passed in the Senate on March 7.