Amateur Radio Field Day demonstrates ham radio’s ability to work reliably under any conditions from almost any location and create an independent communications network. COURTESY PHOTO

Amateur Radio Field Day demonstrates ham radio’s ability to work reliably under any conditions from almost any location and create an independent communications network. COURTESY PHOTO

Amateur Radio Field Day on June 22-23 demonstrates science, skill and service

  • Sunday, June 9, 2019 11:15am
  • News

Members of the Auburn Area Emergency Communications Team (AAECT) participate in the national Amateur Radio Field Day exercise June 22-23 at Game Farm Wilderness Park, 2401 Stuck River Drive.

Since 1933, ham radio operators throughout North America have established temporary ham radio stations in public locations during Field Day to showcase the science and skill of amateur radio. The event is open to the public.

For more than 100 years, amateur radio — also called ham radio — has allowed people from all walks to experiment with electronics and communications techniques, and provide a free public service to their communities during a disaster or emergency, all without needing a cellphone or the internet.

Field Day demonstrates ham radio’s ability to work reliably under any conditions from almost any location and create an independent communications network. More than 35,000 people from thousands of locations participated last year in Field Day 2018 activities.

“It’s easy for anyone to pick up a computer or smartphone, connect to the internet and communicate, with no knowledge of how the devices function or connect to each other,” said David Isgur, communications manager for the American Radio Relay League, the national association for amateur radio. “But if there’s an interruption of service or you’re out of range of a cell tower, you have no way to communicate. Ham radio functions completely independent of the internet or cellphone infrastructure, can interface with tablets or smartphones, and can be set up almost anywhere in minutes. That’s the beauty of amateur radio during a communications outage.

“In today’s electronic do-it-yourself (DIY) environment, ham radio remains one of the best ways for people to learn about electronics, physics, meteorology and numerous other scientific disciplines,” Isgur said. “In addition, amateur radio is a huge asset to any community during disasters or emergencies if the standard communication infrastructure goes down.”

Anyone may become a licensed amateur radio operator. There are more than 725,000 licensed hams in the United States, as young as 9 and as old as 100. And with groups such as the Auburn Area Emergency Communications Team, it’s easy for anybody to get involved right here in Auburn.

For more information about Field Day or amateur radio, contact the City of Auburn Emergency Management Office at 253-876-1925 or email emergencyprep@auburnwa.gov .

More in News

ROBERT WHALE, Auburn Reporter
From the ground up

Crews demolish old school to make way for a new one

Auburn Way South sidewalk improvement project to require lane closures, disruptions | UPDATES

On Monday, Aug. 19, through approximately Friday, Aug. 23, construction work by… Continue reading

Filipino Heritage Day comes to Neely Mansion on Aug. 24

Celebrating the Filipino-American arts, culture and people

Speed limit reduced for work zone on Auburn Way South

Starting Friday, Aug. 16, the speed limit in both directions of Auburn… Continue reading

Celebration for the community

Weekend includes entertainment, kids activities and car show | PHOTOS

The sixth annual Melanie Christianson Memorial Race showcases top barrel races and raises money for paralysis recovery in honor of Christianson. COURTESY PHOTO
Annual barrel race to fundraise for paralysis recovery

Melanie Christianson Memorial Race set for Aug. 25

Prosecutor charges former cheer coach with two counts of sexual exploitation of a minor

The King County Prosecutor on Friday charged a former Celebrity Cheer Unlimited… Continue reading

West Hill residents escape burning home; damage estimated at $1.5 million

A smoke alarm alerted two residents in time to escape their burning… Continue reading

Inslee appoints McDonald to King County Superior Court

Prosecuting attorney part of team in Green River Killer case

Most Read