Rep. Stokesbary revives effort to allow college athletes to receive fair compensation

  • Sunday, January 26, 2020 3:23pm
  • News
Rep. Drew Stokesbary. FILE PHOTO

Rep. Drew Stokesbary. FILE PHOTO

Rep. Drew Stokesbary, R-Auburn, is reviving his effort to allow college athletes to receive fair compensation for the use of their name, image and likeness.

Last January, the 31st District lawmaker introduced House Bill 1084, the first piece of state legislation in the country that would have permitted college athletes to be paid. This year, Stokesbary is offering a new version of HB 1084 that mirrors California’s “Fair Pay to Play Act,” which was signed into law last year. The new version of the bill is scheduled to be heard in the House College and Workforce Development Committee on Tuesday, Jan. 28 at 1:30 p.m.

Under California’s new law, college athletes will have the opportunity to hire agents and sign endorsement deals beginning in 2023.

“It’s time for Washington to treat its student-athletes like all other students,” Stokesbary said. “Only student-athletes are prohibited from receiving fair compensation for their services. All other college students, including those on scholarship, are routinely compensated for their skills, and they are celebrated for it. The NCAA has been using its monopoly power to force student-athletes to sign away the rights to their name, image and likeness. That must end.”

Late last year following the passage of the Fair Pay to Play Act, the NCAA Board of Governors announced it would modify its rules by 2021 to give student-athletes “the opportunity to benefit from the use of their name, image and likeness in a manner consistent with the collegiate model.”

Stokesbary noted the necessity of bills like HB 1084 in continuing to apply pressure to the NCAA.

“One year ago, the NCAA was refusing to change its rules and Congress was showing no interest in this issue,” he added. “Because of legislative action being taken in states like Washington and California, that is changing. However, more states must continue pushing for reform to ensure the NCAA follows through on its promises.”

The 2020 legislative session began Jan. 13 and is scheduled to run for 60 consecutive days.

More in News

Petpalooza’s Dog Trot race registration is $10 through Feb. 24

3K/5K options; register early and save money

PNW plant-based foods could help in climate fight

Animal products create a lot of emissions, but veggie alternatives are coming from King County.

The Colstrip Power Plant in Montana. Puget Sound Energy owns 25 percent of the remaining two units. File photo
PSE files to sell part of Colstrip coal plant

The utility owns two units at the Montana power plant.

Fentanyl (Courtesy photo)
Fentanyl overdoses keep increasing in King County

Meth overdoses are on the rise as well, continuing a trend reported on last year.

Charter review could overhaul King County Sheriff’s Office

Several changes to the King County Sheriff’s Office were proposed.

Prosecutor says Onalaska man, killed, dismembered Auburn man

The King County Prosecutor says Two Dogs Salvatore Fasaga shot 40-year-old Paul… Continue reading

Proposed House bill would be bad for business

Measure could prompt exodus from Auburn

The language of the original bill prohibited privately-owned detainment facilities from being contracted by local, state, or federal government entities, but a last-second amendment was adopted to substantially narrow the focus of the legislation. File photo
Lawmakers flinch on banning for-profit detention facilities

Last minute amendment exempted ICE detainment facility.

Stokesbary introduces billion-dollar tax relief package for Washington’s working families

With Wednesday’s updated state revenue forecast projecting a surge of $1.1 billion… Continue reading

Most Read