Boarders vs. bureaucracy

How a common need for dry land, an unconventional perspective on property rights, and 25 tons of cement brought a community of skateboarders together in Renton.

Skateboarding continues to grow in popularity in the Pacific Northwest. But it’s still difficult for skateboarders to find a good, safe place to get together and do their thing. Rain is a big problem, and covered skate parks are few and far between. Recently, a group of skaters in Renton took matters into their own hands and, using 50,000 pounds of cement, built a park under a freeway overpass. This was, of course, illegal. The Washington Department of Transportation threatened to tear it down last fall, but a crowd of skaters from across the region showed up to defend it. Renton Reporter staff writer Leah Abraham set off to figure out just why one park could mean so much to so many people—and discovered a whole world in the process.

Featuring interviews with Leah Abraham, Jack Skeel, Kristin Ebeling, Marshall Reid, and David Waite

Music by Leeni Ramadan and Jahzzar

This week’s cover photo is a shot of Longacres Skate Park, taken by Leah Abraham for the Renton Reporter in late November 2017.


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